New Trend Feature Shows Hot/Cold Streaks


Slumps and hot streaks – they define every athlete’s career. Get hot at the right time and you’re the toast of the town like David Freese for the recently crowned St. Louis Cardinals. Go cold, and well, you might get run out of town.

Tournament anglers are no different. In fact, one could argue they are more prone to fluctuations in consistency as they not only have to deal with themselves but also things they can’t control, such as weather, fishing moving or the worst, fish coming unbuttoned.

Yet anglers can still get hot, ala Skeet Reese in the beginning of 2010 or Bryan Thrift throughout 2010. And now you can see who has caught fire – or gone cold – with our new trend feature.

If an angler has fished at least two events in the past six months, a graph with appear on his or her profile page. This trending graph plots the angler’s most recent tournaments and compares an angler’s average points from the prior 24 months to the average points from the prior 6 months to establish whether the angler’s recent performance exceeds or falls behind that of a longer span. If the recent average is within 2.5% of the average for the longer period, we consider the angler’s performance to be steady, as indicated by an equals sign, while improved or decreased performance will be indicated by arrows.

This is yet another tool fantasy anglers can use to set their teams, or a way to watch for rising stars in the sport.


About Author

Sean cut his teeth in the journalist world as an award-winning sports reporter, editor and freelancer for various Chicagoland newspapers, including the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun Times and Daily Herald, eventually crossing over into editing and freelance writing in the Outdoor industry. In addition to his position as Editor for, he is also a freelance outdoor writer and lure designer. He resides in the Chicago suburb of Lockport. An avid Bass and Muskie fisherman, his fishing influence began on ponds and lakes in northeast Illinois and has since expanded to a multitude of species across North and Central America. His passion for the sport is rivaled only by his love for building fishing lures, with a number of his designs being used by top professional anglers and produced by various lure companies today. Google+

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